Triceratops

No. 30005

by Safari Ltd
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Triceratops was a large herbivorous horned dinosaur that lived during the very end of the Cretaceous Period (68-66 million years ago) in what is now western North America.

  • Scientific Name: Triceratops. There are two closely related species: Triceratops prorsus and Triceratops horridus.
  • Characteristics: Triceratops can be recognized by the presence of a horn on its snout and a horn over each eye (Triceratops literally means ‘three horned face’), as well as an extensive bony ‘frill’ that projected from the back of the skull and covered the neck. This is a Triceratops prorsus, which had a larger, more upright nasal horn.
  • Size and Color: This model is 10.5 inches long and 4 inches high. It is mostly dark gray with some earth tone patches to make it difficult for predators to see in the distance. The light gray horns and frill edges would have caught the attention of other Triceratops
  • The Triceratops is part of the Great Dinos collection
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free

History

Triceratops is one of the very first dinosaurs to be discovered. A famous paleontologist, Othneil Marsh, working at Yale University, first described and named Triceratops in 1889. Many skeletons have been collected over the years since, and at one point, up to 16 species of Triceratops had been named, all from western North America. Our studies of modern large herbivores indicate that it is highly unlikely that so many species would occupy the same general area (Question: how many species of bison are living on the North American plains today?). Now we only recognize two species: The older is Triceratops horridus, which lived for about one million years, followed by Triceratops prorsus, which lived until the end of the Cretaceous, when it became extinct with the last dinosaurs.

  • Recommended Age: 3+
  • Size in cm: 26.5 L x 10 W x
  • Size in inches: 10.43 L x 3.94 W x
  • UPC: 609366300054
The horns were almost certainly used to ward off carnivorous dinosaurs and probably for combat with other Triceratops. The function of the frill is less certain. It has been suggested that it protected the neck from bites from attacking carnivores, but it was more likely used for display (a bit like the tail of a peacock) – to attract mates or to frighten off competing Triceratops.