Shire Stallion

No. 159505

by Safari Ltd
$6.99USD

The massive Shire horse has held records at various times as both the largest and strongest of all breeds. No wonder, for at over 21 hands high, these magnificent animals tower over even Clydesdales. Once war horses, they are now most often used for farm work and riding.

  • Scientific Name: Equus caballus
  • Characteristics: This Shire Stallion figure shows off the impressive musculature and proud bearing that you’d expect from the descendent of a medieval charger. Its broad, yet gentle face is a hallmark of the breed
  • Size and Color: As might be expected, this 4 ½-inch-tall and 5-inch-long Shire Stallion impresses with its size. A black hide matches the black mane and tail, while white facial markings and white feathering at the ankles provide contrast.
  • The Shire Stallion is part of the Winner's Circle Horses collection.
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free.
  • History

    When Julius Caesar, Emperor of Rome, first came to what we call England, it was at the head of a conquering army. He was said to be impressed by the large horses found in the land, particularly those used in battle. These Great Horses may have been ancestors of today’s Shire Stallion and other large draft horses. Centuries later, as England battled its way through medieval times, various rulers emphasized the breeding of large war horses to carry knights and their heavy armor and weapons. King John imported 100 large stallions from Holland in the thirteenth century for the purpose of breeding more huge horses. Laws were even passed requiring breeders to use large horses, in hopes of propagating the Great Horses so vital to knights. Peace eventually came, and swords were beaten into plowshares, but the Shire Stallion did not lose its usefulness. Before rail and steam, they were vital for moving cargo at docks and in cities, and they proved their worth to countless farmers.

    • Recommended Age: 3+
    • Size in cm: 12 L x 4 W x 10 H
    • Size in inches: 4.72 L x 1.57 W x 3.94 H
    • UPC: 095866159504
    Present Status After the mechanization of modern farming, the numbers of Shire stallion horses fell from over 1 million to just a few thousand in the 1960s. Currently, the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy considers the Shire horse "at risk," indicating fewer than 2,000 registered horses of this breed. Only 250 Shire horses are registered in the United States each year, and the numbers of British Shire horses are similar.