Red Deer Stag

No. 181929

by Safari Ltd
$8.99USD

One of the largest species of deer on planet Earth, the red deer is both native and common to many regions of Europe and Asia. The red deer is extremely adaptable, and because of this has been successfully introduced to Australia, New Zealand, and the Americas.

  • Scientific Name: Cervus elaphus
  • Characteristics: Like many red deer species, males, also known as stags, grow an enormous set of antlers during the spring that they then shed at the end of winter. With his head held high, this hand painted figurine is proudly displaying his beautiful crown of antlers!
  • Size and Color: Measuring 4.25 inches tall and 4.75 inches long, both dimensions of our red deer stag figurine are a little smaller than the height of a soda can. As their name suggest, red deer have a light brownish-red coat with white fur around their neck and tail.
  • The Red Deer Stag is part of the Wild Safari® Wildlife collection
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free
  • History:

    Not only is the red deer one of the most widely distributed deer species with one of the largest ranges worldwide, but it actually has nearly twenty subspecies to its name. Although a handful of the subspecies are classified as vulnerable or endangered, the majority of them have been classified as animals of least concern by the IUCN. Here’s a cool fact: red deer only have their beautiful red coats during the warmer months, because during the winter they grow more insulated coats with a predominantly grey color!

    • Recommended Age: 3+
    • Size in cm: 12 L x 10.75 H
    • Size in inches: 4.72 L x 4.23 H
    • UPC: 095866000486
    Present Although there are population declines and fragmentations in many areas, red deer are not considered to be under any real threat and they are listed as Least Concern. There are some subspecies that are considered threatened in China and are protected. Illegal hunting for deer parts used in traditional medicines in Mongolia have resulted in a 92% decline in the local populations. While it is declining in some of its original territory, it is considered a dangerous introduced species in Central and South America and they are classified as a pest in Queensland, Australia.