Shark Ray

No. 226329

by Safari Ltd
$6.99USD
  • Sometimes called bowmouth guitarfish or mud skates, shark rays inhabit shallow coastal waters and coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean. Their evolutionary path isn’t fully resolved, and some researchers believe that they are the missing link that connects rays and sharks.
  • Scientific Name: Rhina ancylostoma
  • Characteristics: An exceptionally rare species of marine life, consider yourself lucky for spotting this stunning shark ray! Precisely hand painted and meticulously crafted for accurate realism, this shark ray model is an excellent addition to any wildlife figurine collection!
  • Size and Color: Shark rays can have gray, brown, and even bluish upper bodies with small white markings, and they all have white bellies and dark gray bars across their heads. 4.75 inches long and 1.37 inches tall, both dimensions of this model are about an inch smaller than a soda can on its side.
  • The Shark Ray is part of the Wild Safari® Sea Life collection.
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free.
  • History:

    Although shark rays are rare and the exact number of their global population isn’t known, they’re nonetheless classified as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The shark ray is negatively affected by overfishing as well as destruction of its natural habitat due to coral bleaching. In fact, because it’s so rare, faces many conservation threats, and has an usually difficult time reproducing, the shark ray is sometimes referred to as the panda of the aquatic world.

    • Recommended Age: 3+
    • Size in cm: 12.2 L x 6.2 W x 3.5 H
    • Size in inches: 4.8 L x 2.44 W x 1.38 H
    • UPC: 095866226305
    Present Status Shark rays are listed as vulnerable mainly due to a decreasing population in Indonesia. The species faces a number of threats, including unregulated commercial fishing in Southeast Asia, habitat destruction, slow reproduction rates, pollution, coral bleaching and incidental capture in fishing nets. Conservation efforts include the installation of devices in fishing nets to prevent incidental capture and a prohibition on finning in Australia.