Green Sea Turtle Baby

No. 201329

by Safari Ltd
$2.99USD
  • Although green sea turtles grow to be 5 feet long, their babies are only 2 inches long at birth! Female green sea turtles dig holes in the sand to lay anywhere between 50 and 200 eggs. After 2 months, the infant turtles are born and quickly make their way to the water!
  • Scientific Name: Chelonia mydasli
  • Characteristics: From the moment they’re born, green sea turtle babies are on their own – unless you want to help this little one make it to the water, of course! Like all Safari figurines, this turtle tot was hand painted and professionally sculpted to assure life-like realism and immaculate quality.
  • Size and Color: 2.38 inches long and 2.15 inches wide, both dimensions of this figurine as roughly the same size as the length of a stick of lip balm. Although their name suggests otherwise, green sea turtles are predominantly a brownish tan and olive color.
  • The Green Sea Turtle Baby is part of the Wild Safari® Sea Life collection.
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free.
  • History:

    Unfortunately, green sea turtles are classified as endangered on the conservation status spectrum. While much of their population loss is a result of hunting, poaching, fishing nets, habitat destruction, and physical pollution, light pollution is also a serious detriment to the success of green sea turtle reproduction. More specifically, when green sea turtles first emerge from their eggs, they follow the sunlight towards open water. However, light pollution, including the light from buildings and homes, confuses them and forces them to walk away from the water. The good news is that green sea turtles, and sea turtles in general, are amongst the most actively protected animals that are currently endangered or vulnerable.

    • Recommended Age: 3
    • Size in cm: 6.1 L x 5.5 W x 2.6 H
    • Size in inches: 2.4 L x 2.17 W x 1.02 H
    • UPC: 095866201302
    Green Sea Turtle Babies hatch from a clutch of 100 to 200 eggs, and then they make the perilous journey across the sand to their ocean home. They are endangered because of reduced hatching grounds.