Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Baby

No. 267429

by Safari Ltd
$8.99USD
  • Although this little turtle is young, you can tell it's no longer a hatchling due to its yellowish-green shell and flippers. Recently-hatched Kemp's Ridley sea turtles are actually dark purple, and their color slowly changes until they reach maturity at around age 10-12!
  • Scientific Name: Lepidochelys kempii
  • Characteristics: This hand-painted figurine features true-to-life detail in both the coloration and texture of the Kemp's Ridley sea turtle's shell and flippers. While this turtle isn't fully mature, it doesn't have much growing to do as adults only weigh up to 100 pounds, making them the smallest of the eight sea turtle species.
  • Size and Color: This figurine sits 5 inches in length and 6 inches in width, both measurements similar to the length of a soda can on its side. The yellowish-green shell and skin coloration coupled with the white trim is a standout characteristic of this species, and this adorable little turtle is sure to make a great addition to any nature enthusiast's collection.
  • The Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Baby is part of the Incredible Creatures® collection.
  • All of our products are Non-toxic and BPA free.
  • History:

    The Kemp's Ridley sea turtle is not only one of the rarest species of sea turtle, but it is also considered critically endangered due to the over-harvesting of its eggs. While efforts have been made to protect the species and to provide it with safe nesting grounds, its population numbers have not been able to increase. The primary Kemp’s Ridley nesting beach is in the United States on Padre Island National Seashore, south of Corpus Christi Texas, where researches and conservationists protect the turtles until they're old enough to venture out into the open ocean.

    • Recommended Age: 18 months and up
    • Size in cm: 12.5 L x 15 W x H
    • Size in inches: 4.92 L x 5.91 W x 0.0 H
    • UPC: 095866267407
    This species is the smallest known sea turtle. They are also the most endangered, mainly due to getting caught in shrimp nets. Their primary nesting beach in the U.S. is on the Padre Island National Seashore, south of Corpus Christi, Texas, where they are protected until they are ready to be released into the sea.